Welcome to the Norwex Movement

Will Responsible Ecotourism Save the Redwoods?


leaf
Will Responsible Ecotourism Save the Redwoods?

What We Can Do to Help

redwood_1In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, many sequoia and redwood trees were tunneled through in an effort to entice tourists to visit parks and resorts. The tunnels were tall and wide enough to accommodate cars of the day. In January of 2017, however, as a result of winter storms, California’s famous tunnel tree, the Pioneer Cabin, fell. The giant sequoia stood over 250 feet tall and was more than 1,000 years old. Unfortunately, these majestic giants have transitioned from threatened to endangered.

Many believe that the Pioneer Cabin’s demise was a result of the large, manmade cut through the center of its trunk. Because of the tunnel, the tree was no longer able to support growth at the top or through its roots. The root system of the weakened tree finally became too shallow to withstand the seasonal rain.

Consider the Impact

Although visiting parks can support wildlife conservation, it is paramount that we consider the negative impact tourism may have on natural environments. Human interaction can disrupt fragile ecosystems. For example, carving out pathways for trails physically alters the landscape and may cause areas to erode at a faster rate due to increased foot traffic. The presence of humans can also threaten nature conservation by subtly changing the behaviors of animals and plants.

ties_logo

The International Ecotourism Society defines ecotourism as, “Responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people, and involves interpretation and education.”

Appreciating nature and ecotourism focus on minimizing our impact on natural environments and their communities. Ecotourism comes with an added responsibility to our fellow man and the Earth for the benefit of future generations.

There is no arguing that ecotourism has helped bring awareness to national and state parks, thanks to attractions like the Pioneer Cabin Tree. To keep sequoias and other trees from extinction, we must enjoy nature responsibly. And we can take comfort in the fact that fallen trees can still be a source of life as they send up shoots or are used as compost, where new seeds take root.

sequoia_family

We all have something to gain by helping conserve redwood forests. Trees purify the air, hold soil in place and shelter animals. It’s no wonder they symbolize growth, transformation and sustenance. Preserving sequoias and redwoods is also essential to local and indigenous communities who have cultural and social ties to them.

comment_2Redwood forests display the beauty and grandeur of nature. When we go for a hike or have an outdoor picnic, we can show our appreciation for the world around us. When you’re in nature, how do you consciously minimize your impact? Drop us a line below.

Resources:

Have you ever visited a Tunnel Tree?

View Results
 
Yes:
 
25%
No:
 
75%
Total Votes:
132
View Poll
guest
10 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Mickie Crick
Mickie Crick
4 years ago

When our family goes camping, I take my Norwex lids and all of my products!

Judith Martinez
Judith Martinez
4 years ago

A sad day that the famous tree fell down but it’s good they are leaving it alone in the forest! I loved visiting the Redwoods years ago when I lived in San Diego.

Jeannette Forget
Jeannette Forget
4 years ago

When we are walking or 4wheeling in the woods, we never leave any garbage behind! We pick up and bring everything back home to dispose responsibly!

Linda Watson
Linda Watson
4 years ago

We saw the majestic redwoods in BC over 30 years ago and loved them Definitely being conscious of leaving nature as it is found is a huge thing. Picking up debris others have left behind is helpful too.

Sandra Shove
Sandra Shove
4 years ago

My husband, Gregory and I, actually took pictures standing in the middle of this tree. It was an unforgettable experience.

Moderator
Admin
Moderator
4 years ago
Reply to  Sandra Shove

What a beautiful memory. Thanks for sharing, Sandra!

Christy May
Christy May
4 years ago

I wear appropriate footwear and use the paths provided in nature areas. Stepping off the path to avoid a puddle or mud can speed up erosion or destroy plants and fauna. Leaving only footprints is important (pack barbage out with you!) and so is watching where you step.

Sherry Lyle
Sherry Lyle
4 years ago

We are huge fans of state parks and visit them often. While camping, hiking and picnicking, we take reusable containers for food and water. Whatever waste we create is packed out with us. We also pick up trash along the trails as we come across it to leave it in better condition than we found it. We take the motto, “Take only pictures. Leave only footprints.” very seriously.

Jennifer Rottman
Jennifer Rottman
3 years ago

When we are out in nature my kids and I will pick up trash left by others if we come across some.

Gingi Freeman
Gingi Freeman
3 years ago

This is my stomping grounds, I live in the foothills of the Sequoias… and this was a regular weekend spot for me growing up, and I had the honor of visiting Pioneer Cabin and Tunnel Tree with my kids just months before it collapsed.. had no idea it would be my last time seeing it intact. 🙁 We are heartbroken over it.